G. K. ButterfieldG. K. Butterfield – NC1

Current Position: US Representative for NC District 1 since 2004
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Associate Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court from 2001 – 2003

Featured Quote: 
Starting today, over 90% of children in my district will begin receiving monthly #ChildTaxCredit payments of up to $250/child between the ages of 6-17 or up to $300/child under the age of 6.

Featured Video: 
One-on-one sit down with Congressman G.K. Butterfield

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, Congressman G. K. Butterfield (NC-01) released the following statement on the passage of the Committee on Energy and Commerce’s portion of the House Budget Reconciliation Package and Biden Administration’s Build Back Better Act:

“Today, the Committee on Energy and Commerce passed bold legislation that will revitalize our economy, lower costs for American families, and combat the worsening climate crisis,” said Congressman Butterfield. “The healthcare portions of the Build Back Better Act are historic investments in the American people. In this bill we strengthen the Medicaid program by closing the Medicaid coverage gap, expand Medicare benefits to cover dental, vision, and hearing services, provide investments to expand access to home and community based services for millions of older adults and those with disabilities, permanently extend the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and provide pregnant women on Medicaid with a year of postpartum coverage.

“The Build Back Better Act permanently closes the Medicaid coverage gap, expanding access to healthcare for 207,000 people in North Carolina, including 17,000 working families, seniors, veterans, and children living in the First Congressional District. Affordable, quality care like Medicaid is associated with better health outcomes, lower maternal mortality, and increased economic mobility. No longer will access to healthcare be held hostage to the political whims of Republican lawmakers.”

“The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated the homework gap, digital divide, and acutely displayed the lack of resources many students and schools face. The Build Back Better Act continues Congressional Democrats’ efforts to bridge the homework gap and digital divide by providing an additional $4 billion to the Emergency Connectivity Fund to ensure students, school staff, and library patrons have internet connectivity and devices at locations other than a school or a library.

“The climate crisis is here, and this legislation ensures we are taking meaningful action now that will impact generations to come. The climate crisis poses a great danger to our state, our nation, and the world. The Build Back Better Act makes necessary, historic investments in our communities and our economy, putting the United States and states like North Carolina on the path to both a cleaner and more prosperous future.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for NC District 1 since 2004
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Associate Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court from 2001 – 2003

Featured Quote: 
Starting today, over 90% of children in my district will begin receiving monthly #ChildTaxCredit payments of up to $250/child between the ages of 6-17 or up to $300/child under the age of 6.

Featured Video: 
One-on-one sit down with Congressman G.K. Butterfield

News

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, Congressman G. K. Butterfield (NC-01) released the following statement on the passage of the Committee on Energy and Commerce’s portion of the House Budget Reconciliation Package and Biden Administration’s Build Back Better Act:

“Today, the Committee on Energy and Commerce passed bold legislation that will revitalize our economy, lower costs for American families, and combat the worsening climate crisis,” said Congressman Butterfield. “The healthcare portions of the Build Back Better Act are historic investments in the American people. In this bill we strengthen the Medicaid program by closing the Medicaid coverage gap, expand Medicare benefits to cover dental, vision, and hearing services, provide investments to expand access to home and community based services for millions of older adults and those with disabilities, permanently extend the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and provide pregnant women on Medicaid with a year of postpartum coverage.

“The Build Back Better Act permanently closes the Medicaid coverage gap, expanding access to healthcare for 207,000 people in North Carolina, including 17,000 working families, seniors, veterans, and children living in the First Congressional District. Affordable, quality care like Medicaid is associated with better health outcomes, lower maternal mortality, and increased economic mobility. No longer will access to healthcare be held hostage to the political whims of Republican lawmakers.”

“The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated the homework gap, digital divide, and acutely displayed the lack of resources many students and schools face. The Build Back Better Act continues Congressional Democrats’ efforts to bridge the homework gap and digital divide by providing an additional $4 billion to the Emergency Connectivity Fund to ensure students, school staff, and library patrons have internet connectivity and devices at locations other than a school or a library.

“The climate crisis is here, and this legislation ensures we are taking meaningful action now that will impact generations to come. The climate crisis poses a great danger to our state, our nation, and the world. The Build Back Better Act makes necessary, historic investments in our communities and our economy, putting the United States and states like North Carolina on the path to both a cleaner and more prosperous future.”

About

G. K. Butterfield 1

Source: Government page

Congressman G. K. Butterfield is a life-long resident of eastern North Carolina. Raised in Wilson, Congressman Butterfield spent his formative years attending Charles H. Darden High School and worked tirelessly in the Civil Rights Movement as a young adult. His parents were Dr. & Mrs. G. K. Butterfield, Sr. His father practiced dentistry for 50 years and served as one of North Carolina’s first black elected officials since Reconstruction. His mother was a classroom teacher for 48 years.

Congressman Butterfield graduated from college and law school at North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina. After earning his law degree, Congressman Butterfield founded a law practice in Wilson and served the community in that capacity for 13 years. He is best known for his successful litigation of voting rights cases that resulted in the election of African-American elected officials throughout eastern North Carolina.

In 1988, Congressman Butterfield was elected as Resident Superior Court judge. In this role, he presided over civil and criminal court in 46 counties of North Carolina. For two years, he served on the North Carolina Supreme Court by appointment of the governor. Butterfield retired from the judiciary after 15 years of service and successfully ran for Congress. He was elected to serve the First District of North Carolina in the U.S. House of Representatives in a special election on July 20, 2004, where he continues to serve today.

In Congress, Butterfield is a champion of affordable health care, education, investments in rural communities, veterans, renewable energies, and federal programs that support low-income and middle-class Americans.

Butterfield serves in the Democratic leadership as Chief Deputy Whip and is a past Chair of the Congressional Black Caucus (114th Congress). He sits on the influential Committee on Energy & Commerce where he serves as the Vice Chair of the Subcommittee on Health. In addition, he serves as a member of the Subcommittees of Communications and Technology and Energy. In the 116th Congress, Congressman Butterfield also sits on the Committee on House Administration where serves as a member of the Subcommittee on Elections.

Congressman Butterfield is a life-long member of Jackson Chapel First Missionary Baptist Church. He is a veteran of the U.S. Army and a proud father and grandfather.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

  • Congressional Black Caucus (first vice chair for the 113th United States Congress; chair for the 114th United States Congress)
  • United States Congressional International Conservation Caucus
  • Congressional Motorcycle Safety Caucus
  • Congressional Out-of-Poverty Caucus

 

Experience

Work Experience

  • Attorney
  • North Carolina Resident Superior Court Judge
    1988 to 2001
  • Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court
    2001 to 2002
  • North Carolina Special Superior Court Judge
    2002 to 2004

Education

Personal

Birth Year: 1947
Place of Birth: Wilson, NC
Gender: Male
Religion: Christian: Baptist
Children: Valeisha & Lenai

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington D.C. Office
2080 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-3101

Durham Office
2741 Campus Walk Avenue Bldg. 400, Ste. 300
Durham, NC 27705
Phone: (919) 908-0164
Fax: (919) 908-0169

Wilson Office
216 NE Nash Street, Suite B
Wilson, NC 27893
Phone: (252) 237-9816
Fax: (252) 291-0356

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

George Kenneth Butterfield Jr. (born April 27, 1947) is an American lawyer and politician serving as the U.S. representative for North Carolina’s 1st congressional district since 2004. A member of the Democratic Party, he was first elected in a special election after the resignation of Frank Ballance.

His district is in the state’s northeastern corner, which includes all or parts of 19 counties. A longtime advocate of civil rights, Butterfield was appointed an associate justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court by Governor Mike Easley in 2001, retaining the position until 2003. He is a member of the Congressional Black Caucus and served as its chair from 2015 to 2017.

In November 2021, Butterfield announced that he would not run for election in 2022.[1]

Early life and education

G. K. Butterfield was born and raised in the then segregated city of Wilson, North Carolina. Butterfield came from a prominent African-American family with a long history in North Carolina. Both of Butterfield’s parents were mixed-race Americans.[2] His maternal grandfather, Joe Davis, was a child of a formerly enslaved person (Judah Davis) and a white man.[3] His mother, Addie, taught elementary school for 48 years in some of North Carolina’s poorest communities. She was keenly focused on ensuring that her students learned to read—a right denied to many blacks in the South.[4] Butterfield’s father, G. K. Butterfield Sr., was an immigrant from Bermuda.[5] As a graduate of Meharry Medical College, he practiced dentistry for 50 years in the poor, segregated community of East Wilson. In the late 1940s, he helped found the Wilson Branch of the NAACP in order to register black voters in the county. In 1953, he became the first African American elected to the city council in Wilson and the first black elected official in eastern North Carolina since Reconstruction.[4]

Butterfield graduated from Charles H. Darden High School in Wilson.[4] He went on to earn a Bachelor of Arts in political science and sociology from North Carolina Central University (NCCU), a historically black university.[6] During his time at NCCU, Butterfield was active in voter registration activism, including coordinating voter registration drives in Durham and organizing a student march from the State Capitol in Raleigh to the Wilson County Courthouse to draw attention to the importance of voter registration. After completing his bachelor’s degree, Butterfield attended the NCCU School of Law, receiving a Juris Doctor degree in 1974.[6]

During his junior year at NCCU, Butterfield was drafted into the United States Army and stationed at Fort Bragg Army installation in Fayetteville.[4] He served from 1968 to 1970[7] and was honorably discharged, and he returned to NCCU to complete his undergraduate degree.[4]

In describing his racial identity as a black man, he has pointed to his African heritage, as a direct descendant of enslaved people.[8] He grew up in racially segregated North Carolina, living in “East Wilson”, where he attended black schools. He spent his childhood as a firsthand witness to the disenfranchisement of his black community originating as part of a targeted campaign to remove his father from the Board of Aldermen.[3] He is the former chair of the Congressional Black Caucus.[9][10]

Judicial career

After completing law school, Butterfield began a 14-year legal career as a civil rights attorney, practicing across eastern North Carolina. During this time, he developed his reputation, winning several voting-rights cases.[4]

In 1988, Butterfield was elected Resident Superior Court judge in judicial district 7BC. Beginning on January 1, 1989, and for the next 12 years, he presided over civil and criminal court in 46 North Carolina counties.[6] In February 2001, Governor Mike Easley appointed him to the North Carolina Supreme Court.[6] In 2002, Butterfield lost his seat on the Supreme Court, but he returned to the Superior Court bench by special appointment of Governor Easley. He served in that position until his retirement in May 2004 to run for the U.S. House of Representatives.[6]

Political career

Butterfield was first elected to the House of Representatives in a special election on July 20, 2004[11] to fill the seat of Frank Ballance, who had resigned after pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud and money laundering.[12] He assumed office on July 21, 2004.[13]

U.S. House of Representatives

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Butterfield serves on the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, and formerly served on the House Armed Services Committee and the House Agriculture Committee. He is the Region VIII representative on the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee.

Beginning in 2007, in the 110th Congress, Butterfield was chosen to serve as one of eight Chief Deputy Whips for the House Democratic Caucus. Chief Deputy Whips assist in the formulation of Democratic policy and ensure the passage of legislation by maintaining good communication with members. He was appointed to this position by Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Majority Whip Jim Clyburn.[6]

Political positions

As a member of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, Butterfield advocated for the American Clean Energy and Security Act.[16] He supports “a market-based approach to capping carbon emissions”[17] and wants to broaden the United States’ sources of energy.[18] On his website, Butterfield stresses the need to find more clean and domestic sources of energy.[17]

A strong supporter of civil rights, Butterfield advocated renewal of the Voting Rights Act and “introduced a bill calling for the Capitol Visitor’s Center to acknowledge the slave labor used to build the Capitol.”[19]

Originally endorsing John Edwards for the 2008 Democratic Party presidential nomination,[20] Butterfield endorsed Barack Obama in January 2008.[21]

In 2009, Butterfield introduced the Don’t Let the Bed Bugs Bite Act “to assist states in carrying out inspections of lodging facilities, train inspection personnel, contract with a commercial exterminator; educate owners and staff at lodging facilities.”[22] He also passed H.R. 4252 “[t]o amend the Small Business Act to change the net worth amount under the small business program for socially and economically disadvantaged individuals from $750,000 to $978,722, and for other purposes.”[23]

Butterfield supported the Affordable Care Act, and worked with the Energy and Commerce Committee to help write the legislation.[24] During the discussion of the bill in Congress, he complained about the lack of cooperation from Republicans.[24]

Butterfield supports increasing taxes for higher-income families while decreasing taxes for middle- and low-income families.[24] Although he is an advocate for using government stimulus in order to improve the economy, he wants to reduce government regulations on the private sector.[24]

In 2008, Planned Parenthood gave Butterfield an 80% rating. In 2009, Butterfield supported the interests of NARAL Pro-Choice America 100% of the time.[24] He identifies as pro-choice on abortion, and especially supports legalized abortion when the life of the woman is in danger or if the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest.[24] He called the day that the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade a “sad day.”[25]

Butterfield has repeatedly voted against defining marriage as being between one man and one woman, voting against the Marriage Protection Act of 2004 and constitutional marriage amendments in 2004 and 2006. He has voted to ban job discrimination based on sexual orientation, and in 2010 voted for the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell.[26]

Butterfield voted in 2008 against the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) $700 billion bailout of the financial industry and the $14 billion rescue package for the auto industry.[27]

In 2011, he voted to extend expiring provisions of the PATRIOT Act[28] and in favor of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2012.[29]

In 2012, Butterfield introduced legislation that would require more input from the public before tolls are introduced on roads. The legislation was in response to the “No toll on I-95” group, a Roanoke Rapids-based group that opposes instating a toll on I-95. Opponents of the toll argue that it leads to double taxation, and say it is the first time that “the federal government has put tolls on an existing interstate.”[30]

In April 2012, Butterfield accompanied Obama to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to speak about extending the interest rates on federal loan programs for many undergraduate students. Butterfield expressed concern with the pending expiration, saying: “Allowing the current interest rates to expire would burden students with additional debt, prolong their ability to kick start their careers, and send the message that it is more important to cut taxes for the wealthy than educational expenses for our young people.”[31]

On July 23, 2014, Butterfield introduced House Joint Resolution 120, approving the location of a memorial to commemorate the more than 5,000 slaves and free black persons who fought for independence in the American Revolution.[32][33]

Political campaigns

2004

Butterfield was elected to Congress in a special election on July 20, 2004, to fill the unexpired term of Representative Frank Ballance, who had resigned for health reasons. He defeated Republican nominee Greg Dority and Libertarian Party nominee Tom Eisenmenger. Butterfield was sworn into office on July 21, 2004.

On July 20, 2004, Butterfield won the Democratic primary, entitling him to run in the November general election. Running against Dority again, he won his first full term with 64% of the popular vote.[34][35]

2006

Butterfield was unopposed for reelection in 2006.

2008

Butterfield defeated Dean Stephens with 70.28% of the vote.[36]

2010

Butterfield defeated Republican nominee Ashley Woolard with 59.31% of the vote.[37]

2012

Butterfield speaking at the 2012 Democratic National Convention

Butterfield defeated Republican Pete DiLauro with 75.32% of the vote.[38]

2014

Butterfield defeated Republican Arthur Rich with 73.38% of the vote.[39]

2016

Butterfield defeated Republican H. Powell Dew Jr. with 68.62% of the vote.[40]

2018

Butterfield defeated Republican Roger W. Allison with 69.85% of the vote.[41]

2020

Butterfield defeated Republican Sandy Smith with 54.18% of the vote.[42]

Personal life

Butterfield is a lifelong member of Jackson Chapel First Missionary Baptist Church in Wilson, North Carolina, where he has served as Trustee and Chairman of the Finance Ministry.[6] He also serves on the Board of Visitors for the North Carolina Central University School of Law and as a Trustee of Gallaudet University.[4] He is a member of Groove Phi Groove Social Fellowship, Incorporated.[43] In 2017, the City of Greenville named its new transit center, the G.K. Butterfield Transportation Center, in his honor.[44]

See also

References

  1. ^ “Another blow to Dems’ House hopes: Butterfield retiring in N.C.” POLITICO. November 17, 2021. Retrieved 22 November 2021.
  2. ^ “g k butterfield”. Retrieved 3 April 2017.
  3. ^ a b Flint, Matthew. “Hackney Library: Crossing the Tracks: An Oral History of East and West Wilson, North Carolina: Congressman G. K. Butterfield”. barton.libguides.com. Retrieved 2020-06-24.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g “Full Biography”. Representative G. K. Butterfield. 2018-05-17. Retrieved 2020-06-24.
  5. ^ “CSCE :: Testimony :: Hon. G.K. Butterfield Commissioner – Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe”. Csce.gov. Retrieved 2010-08-23.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g “About GK”. United States House of Representatives. Archived from the original on 2008-07-30. Retrieved 2008-11-05.
  7. ^ BUTTERFIELD, George Kenneth, Jr. (G.K.), (1947 – ) Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
  8. ^ AP, “Many insisting that Obama is not black”, Huffington Post, 14 December 2008, accessed 4 April 2013
  9. ^ “Committees & Caucuses”. 8 August 2014. Retrieved 3 April 2017.
  10. ^ “Membership”. Congressional Black Caucus. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  11. ^ “Short Biography”. Representative G. K. Butterfield. 2019-02-01. Retrieved 2020-05-13.
  12. ^ WRAL (2004-05-07). “Frank Ballance Resigns Candidacy, Cites Health Concerns”. WRAL.com. Retrieved 2020-05-13.
  13. ^ “G.K. Butterfield”. The Washington Times. Retrieved 2020-05-13.
  14. ^ “Butterfield elected to Congressional Black Caucus”. The Daily Reflector. November 16, 2012. Retrieved February 17, 2013.
  15. ^ “Our Members”. U.S. House of Representatives International Conservation Caucus. Archived from the original on 1 August 2018. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  16. ^ Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.) (June 15, 2009). “Poorest Americans, contributing least to climate change, will not be hurt by legislation to rectify”. The Hill.
  17. ^ a b “Energy & Global Climate Change”. Congressman G.K. Butterfield Official Website. Archived from the original on 2010-12-10.
  18. ^ Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.) (June 15, 2010). “Hearing with oil executives underscores need for energy overhaul”. The Hill.
  19. ^ “G.K. Butterfield, (D-N.C.)”, Politics, Washington Post, 23 December 2011, accessed 4 April 2013
  20. ^ Butterfield now endorses Obama Archived May 24, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  21. ^ Boyer, Robert (2008-10-12). “Hunt among state Dems stumping for Obama”. Times-News. Archived from the original on 2008-10-14.
  22. ^ “StackPath”.
  23. ^ G., Butterfield (9 December 2009). “Text – H.R.4253 – 111th Congress (2009-2010): To amend the Small Business Act to change the net worth amount under the small business program for socially and economically disadvantaged individuals from $750,000 to $978,722, and for other purposes”. thomas.loc.gov. Archived from the original on 3 July 2016. Retrieved 6 February 2018.
  24. ^ a b c d e f “The Voter’s Self Defense System”. Retrieved 3 April 2017.
  25. ^ Butterfield, G. K. “Today is a sad day in American jurisprudence.”. Twitter. Retrieved 25 June 2022.
  26. ^ “G.K. Butterfield – Gay Marriage”. The Political Guide. 3 April 2021.
  27. ^ “Democrat George Kenneth ‘G.K.’ Butterfield, Jr”. Washington Post. Archived from the original on 24 December 2013. Retrieved 15 May 2012.
  28. ^ http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2011/roll036.xml[bare URL]
  29. ^ “HR 1540 National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 – Voting Record”. Project Vote Smart. Retrieved 5 April 2012.
  30. ^ “Butterfield to announce tolling bill”. Chicago Tribune. 4 May 2012.
  31. ^ Johnston, Bill (24 April 2012). “Butterfield to Join President Obama at Chapel Hill Speech Today”. Goldsboro Daily News. Retrieved 15 May 2012.
  32. ^ “H.J.Res. 120 – All Actions”. United States Congress. Retrieved 9 September 2014.
  33. ^ Marcos, Cristina (8 September 2014). “House authorizes location for American Revolution memorial in D.C.” The Hill. Retrieved 9 September 2014.
  34. ^ William L. Holmes (21 July 2004). “Butterfield Wins Special Election; Will Face Dority in November”. Associated Press.
  35. ^ Cindy George (21 July 2004). “Former Justice Wins 1st District; Butterfield Fills Ballance’s Seat”. News and Observer. p. A16.
  36. ^ “North Carolina Election Results 2008”. New York Times. Retrieved 2008-11-06.
  37. ^ “US House of Representatives District 1 Results 2010”. North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved 17 March 2021.
  38. ^ “US House of Representatives District 1 Results 2012”. North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved 17 March 2021.
  39. ^ “US House of Representatives District 1 Results 2014”. North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved 17 March 2021.
  40. ^ “US House of Representatives District 1 Results 2016”. North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved 17 March 2021.
  41. ^ “US House of Representatives District 1 Results 2018”. North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved 17 March 2021.
  42. ^ “US House of Representatives District 1 Results 2020”. North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved 17 March 2021.
  43. ^ Davis, Edmond (2011-08-30). “Groove Phi Groove Social Fellowship (1962- )”. BlackPast.org. Retrieved 11 December 2011.
  44. ^ “City to name transportation center for Butterfield”. The Daily Reflector. Greenville, NC. November 28, 2017. Retrieved May 6, 2022.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from North Carolina’s 1st congressional district

2004–present
Incumbent
Preceded by

Chair of the Congressional Black Caucus
2015–2017
Succeeded by

Party political offices
Preceded by

as House Democratic Assistant to the Majority Whip

House Democratic Senior Chief Deputy Whip
2021–present
Served alongside: Jan Schakowsky
Incumbent
Preceded by

U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
69th
Succeeded by


Recent Elections

2018 US Senator for District 1

G.K. Butterfield (D)190,45769.8%
Roger Allison (R)82,21830.2%
TOTAL272,675

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

BUTTERFIELD JR, GEORGE KENNETH (GK) has run in 6 races for public office, winning 5 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $4,378,652.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Committee on Energy and Commerce Members
Committee on House Administration Members
Joint Committee on the Library Members

Subcommittees

House Subcommittee on Communications & Technology
House Subcommittee on Health
House Subcommittee on Energy

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Congress.gov

Issues

Committees

Committee on Energy & Commerce
Congressman Butterfield serves on the oldest and one of the most influential legislative committees in the U.S. House of Representatives, which encompasses a wide-range of responsibilities including telecommunications, consumer protection, environmental quality, interstate commerce, and healthcare. On this committee, Congressman Butterfield fights for jobs, broadband expansion, and safe energy practices.

Committee on House Administration
Congressman Butterfield serves on this committee which had been established as part of the larger effort to streamline the U.S. House of Representatives. Today, the two main principal functions include oversight of federal elections and day-to-day operations in the House. On this committee, Congressman Butterfield fights for voting rights and fair elections.

Joint Committee of Congress on the Library
Congressman Butterfield serves on the oldest continuing joint committee in the U.S. Congress. Today, the Committee has oversight of the operations of the Library of Congress, as well as management of the National Statuary Hall Collection, the U.S. Botanic Garden, and works of fine art in the Capitol.

Subcommittees

Subcommittee on Communications & Technology
Subcommittee on Health
Subcommittee on Energy
Subcommittee on Elections, Chairman

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

Grow Our Economy & Create Jobs
Overview
Congressman Butterfield is committed to the policies that will help grow our economy and produce job opportunites for the people of the First District and across the state. The strength and ingenuity of the First District can power North Carolina into a new era of prosperity.

‘Make it in America’
Congressman Butterfield is dedicated to helping the American workforce by encouraging businesses to manufacture products within the nation and promoting the export of American goods. With this increase in manufacturing, Americans deserve a thorughtful energy plan that will not only supply its energy demands, but also create green jobs. Creating relationships between local and global businesses will produce opportunities for market expansion, innovation, and job creation.

Build a 21st Century Infrastructure
Congressman Butterfield hopes to maintain and improve all modes of transportation from high and rail, to airports and sea ports. A connected North Carolina provides job opportunities, moving commerce, and a stronger connection with the global economy.

Invest in Rural Communities
As a senior member of the Subcommittee on Communications and Technology for the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Congressman Butterfield’s goal is to connect the rural communities of the First Distrcit to the global exchange of technology. Providing agricultural producers with access to world markets, employment opportunities, federal assistance, and new methods of production are critical if rural communities are to thrive.
Expand Opportunity
Overview
Congressman Butterfield believes that hard work and responsibility should be rewarded. The people of the First District deserve equal and fair access to the tools and opportunities that allow them to compete in the global workforce, earn decent wages, and have a fair shot at obtaining the American dream.

Improve Education and Give Children a Head Start
As the son of a school teacher, Congressman Butterfield knows that education is the best investment we can make in our nation’s future.  Early childhood programs such as Head Start and quality primary education will give children the solid foundation to compete in the global workforce, earn fair wages and lead our nation forward.

Train North Carolinians for Jobs of the Future
Congressman Butterfield believes bold action is needed to bridge the gap between those looking for jobs and employers looking for skilled workers. Strengthening our competitiveness begins with providing North Carolinians with tools to succeed through expanding access to high quality education and innovative training programs. Doing so will grow the pool of highly skilled workers that companies are looking for to grow their businesses.

Promote Women’s Economic Agenda
Congressman Butterfield is committed to breaking down the barriers to equal pay and employment for women. True opportunity requires that all people, regardless of their gender, have equal access to the rights, benefits, and opportunities defined by our Constitution. Congressman Butterfield supported President Obama in passing the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act in 2009, which provides a remedy for women and men who have been victims of pay discrimination.

End Poverty & Hunger
Overview
Congressman Butterfield understands that a weakened U.S. economy depresses incomes, strains households, and eliminates entire job markets, making it harder for families to stay healthy and provide for their loved ones. He will continue to protect and improve crucial safety net programs that help families get back on their feet after unexpected challenges.

Make Sure No Child Goes Hungry
As Co-chair of the Out of Poverty Caucus and member of the Democratic Whip’s Task Force on Poverty, Income Inequality, and Opportunity, Congressman Butterfield will continue to protect and strengthen crucial safety net programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Unemployment Insurance (UI) programs, and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), which help families get back on their feet after unexpected challenges. These critical programs are absolutely essential to keep children and families from going hungry while helping get people back to work.

Provide Access to Affordable, Quality Healthcare
As an influential leader on the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health, Congressman Butterfield is committed to ensuring that Americans have access to health care. He played a supportive role in the development of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that has given millions of uninsured and underinsured Americans access to affordable healthcare.

Increase Affordable Housing Options
Congressman Butterfield believes that homeownership is a key part of achieving the American Dream.  Homeownership constitutes the bulk of wealth for the majority of American households and represents a stepping stone into the middle class.

Protect Voting Rights
Overview
As former civil rights attorney and advocate of voting rights, Congressman Butterfield believes the right to vote embodies the spirit of American democracy. He works tirelessly to eliminate barriers that prevent North Carolinians from exercising their right to vote in free and fair elections.

Fight for Voting Rights Nationwide
Congressman Butterfield is dedicated to protect the right to vote for all Americans. On June 25, 2013, the Supreme Court struck down Section 4 (b) of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (VRA).  The historic VRA prohibits racial discrimination in elections.  Section 4 of the VRA is the formula that designates certain areas of the country that must have proposed changes to their voting laws cleared by the federal government or in federal court before implementing those changes.  Without an enforceable Section 4, the VRA has been exploited by extreme and conservative state legislatures in an effort to suppress minority voters.  Congressman Butterfield will not let this setback to the VRA hinder America’s progress for equality and representative democracy.

Fight for Voting Rights in NC
Congressman Butterfield is fighting to stop the aggressive efforts to disenfranchise voters in North Carolina. The right to vote for all eligible adults embodies the spirit of American democracy and should be protected.
Support Our Military & Veterans
Overview
As a veteran of the U.S. Army, Congressman Butterfield believes we need to do more for our veterans and servicemembers. One of the most important aspects of his job in Congress is to proudly represent and support servicemembers and their families of the First District, which is home to Seymour Johnson Air Force Base in Goldsboro.

Provide Education to Our Veterans
A long-time advocate of our men and women in uniform, Congressman Butterfield believes that educational benefits are important steps towards honoring those who serve and helping them prepare for civilian life. He is working to resolve an inequity in existing law that allots fewer education funds to veterans who attend public institutions of higher learning.

Improve Veterans Healthcare
Congressman Butterfield demands that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs quickly make meaningful reforms to remedy the problems within the VA healthcare system so our veterans can start receiving the high quality care they deserve. As a country, we must support those who protect our freedom and provide them with quality healthcare.

Honor Merchant Mariners
Congressman Butterfield is committed to honoring the brave men and women who served our country in the Merchant Marines during World War II and have gone unrecognized for their service.  Through no fault of their own, these selfless individuals have been unable to prove their service in the Merchant Marines because the documents needed to prove service either did not survive over time or never existed at all.  Congressman Butterfield believes now is the time to stand-up for these great Americans and give them the recognition they rightly deserve.

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G. K. Butterfield – NC1

Current Position: US Representative for NC District 1 since 2004
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Associate Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court from 2001 – 2003

Featured Quote: 
Starting today, over 90% of children in my district will begin receiving monthly #ChildTaxCredit payments of up to $250/child between the ages of 6-17 or up to $300/child under the age of 6.

Featured Video: 
One-on-one sit down with Congressman G.K. Butterfield

Deborah Ross – NC2

Current Position: US Representative for NC 2nd District since 2021
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Lawyer from 1990 – 2013

Featured Quote: 
Republicans want to pick their voters rather than have voters pick their politicians. Honored to join @TheRevAl
to discuss how we can combat GOP-led voter suppression efforts in legislatures across America. We must use every tool at our disposal to protect the right to vote.

Featured Video: 
NC Congresswoman Deborah Ross supports COVID-19 relief

David Price – NC4

Current Position: US Representative for NC 4th District since 1997
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): US Senator

Other Positions:  
Chair, Subcommittees Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies

Featured Quote: 
#ICYMI: I hosted a roundtable on the importance of child care w/ 4th district leaders. The #AmericanFamiliesPlan tackles generational inequities by investing in high-quality child care, helping youth thrive & their families participate in the labor force.

Featured Video: 
The Congressional Experience: An Institution Transformed | Conversation with Congressman David Price

Kathy Manning – NC6

Current Position: US Representative for NC 6th District since 2021
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): US Senator

Featured Quote: 
Today is my 100th day as your Congresswoman! Here in #NC06 my team and I have been hard at work for you. If you need assistance with a federal agency, please call my office at (336) 333-5005. For more updates, sign up for my newsletter at http://manning.house.gov.

Featured Video: 
Kathy Manning talks COVID-19, record vote count after win in 6th Congressional District race

Alma Adams – NC12

Current Position: US Representative for District 12 since 2015
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 1994 – 2013

Other Positions:  
Vice Chair, Subcommittee on Nutrition, Oversight, and Department Operations – Committee on Agriculture
Chair, Subcommittee on Workforce Protections – Committee on Education and Labor

Featured Quote: 
#12YearChallenge The last time Congress increased the federal minimum wage, I was a North Carolina state representative who had just passed an increase in our state minimum wage. I also had fewer hats. Needless to say, 12 years is too long. It’s time to #RaiseTheWage!

Featured Video: 
US Representative Alma Adams delivers 2021 commencement address at Xavier University

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