Roy CooperRoy Cooper

Current Position: Governor since 2017
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Attorney General from 2001 – 2017; State Senator from 1991 – 2001; US Representative from 1987 – 1991

Featured Quote: 
Business is thriving in North Carolina, and it’s not hard to see why — our talented workers, welcoming communities and nationally-ranked universities and community colleges continue bringing more companies to our great state.

Featured Video: 
Coronavirus Briefing: NC Gov. Roy Cooper (07/21/21)

Today, Governor Roy Cooper and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Mandy K. Cohen, M.D. provided an update on the state’s COVID-19 key metrics and trends.

In an open letter to faith leaders, Governor Cooper and Secretary Cohen expressed their gratitude for the faith community’s support throughout the pandemic response and asked for their help reaching North Carolinians who have not yet been vaccinated.

“Getting vaccinated is one of the deepest expressions of our shared values to protect human life and love our neighbor. It is an act of love to our families and our communities. While we have made much progress in the state, too many people are needlessly getting seriously ill, being hospitalized, and dying. Our hospitals are strained, and in other states we’ve seen that care is not readily available for people experiencing non-COVID life-threatening health crises. We need your help,” Governor Cooper and Secretary Cohen wrote.

The letter outlines three actions that faith leaders can take, including directing their congregation and faith community to trustworthy sources about COVID-19 vaccines, serving as vaccine ambassadors, and hosting vaccination events.

Faith leaders from all religious backgrounds can be trusted figures in their communities. Their word can go a long way in encouraging people to talk with doctors and understand that these vaccines are safe and effective. The NC DHHS Healthier Together team is working with houses of worship to sponsor their own vaccine clinics.

Governor Cooper also highlighted a milestone reached this week in North Carolina’s vaccination progress. Ninety percent of North Carolinians age 65 and older have now received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

To date, North Carolina has administered over 11 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, with 63 percent of the adult population fully vaccinated. Sixty-eight percent of adults have received at least one dose of the vaccine, including 90 percent of North Carolinians 65 and over.

Learn more about the state’s vaccine distribution at myspot.nc.gov (English) or Vacunate.nc.gov (Spanish). Use NCDHHS’ online tool Find a Vaccine Location to find a nearby vaccine site. Call the state’s COVID-19 vaccine hotline at 888-675-4567. Ask your doctor about Monoclonal Antibodies or call the Combat COVID Monoclonal Antibodies Call Center at 1-877-332-6585 (English) or 1-877-366-0310 (Spanish).

Summary

Current Position: Governor since 2017
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Attorney General from 2001 – 2017; State Senator from 1991 – 2001; US Representative from 1987 – 1991

Featured Quote: 
Business is thriving in North Carolina, and it’s not hard to see why — our talented workers, welcoming communities and nationally-ranked universities and community colleges continue bringing more companies to our great state.

Featured Video: 
Coronavirus Briefing: NC Gov. Roy Cooper (07/21/21)

News

Today, Governor Roy Cooper and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Mandy K. Cohen, M.D. provided an update on the state’s COVID-19 key metrics and trends.

In an open letter to faith leaders, Governor Cooper and Secretary Cohen expressed their gratitude for the faith community’s support throughout the pandemic response and asked for their help reaching North Carolinians who have not yet been vaccinated.

“Getting vaccinated is one of the deepest expressions of our shared values to protect human life and love our neighbor. It is an act of love to our families and our communities. While we have made much progress in the state, too many people are needlessly getting seriously ill, being hospitalized, and dying. Our hospitals are strained, and in other states we’ve seen that care is not readily available for people experiencing non-COVID life-threatening health crises. We need your help,” Governor Cooper and Secretary Cohen wrote.

The letter outlines three actions that faith leaders can take, including directing their congregation and faith community to trustworthy sources about COVID-19 vaccines, serving as vaccine ambassadors, and hosting vaccination events.

Faith leaders from all religious backgrounds can be trusted figures in their communities. Their word can go a long way in encouraging people to talk with doctors and understand that these vaccines are safe and effective. The NC DHHS Healthier Together team is working with houses of worship to sponsor their own vaccine clinics.

Governor Cooper also highlighted a milestone reached this week in North Carolina’s vaccination progress. Ninety percent of North Carolinians age 65 and older have now received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

To date, North Carolina has administered over 11 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, with 63 percent of the adult population fully vaccinated. Sixty-eight percent of adults have received at least one dose of the vaccine, including 90 percent of North Carolinians 65 and over.

Learn more about the state’s vaccine distribution at myspot.nc.gov (English) or Vacunate.nc.gov (Spanish). Use NCDHHS’ online tool Find a Vaccine Location to find a nearby vaccine site. Call the state’s COVID-19 vaccine hotline at 888-675-4567. Ask your doctor about Monoclonal Antibodies or call the Combat COVID Monoclonal Antibodies Call Center at 1-877-332-6585 (English) or 1-877-366-0310 (Spanish).

Twitter

About

Roy Cooper 1

Source: Government page

Roy Cooper is a trusted leader and family man who is honored to serve as North Carolina’s Governor.

Roy Cooper has spent nearly three decades in public service protecting families, keeping communities safe, and working to create jobs and improve schools. The son of a school teacher, he knows that education creates opportunity and he has worked throughout his career to strengthen our schools and create a sound foundation for our state’s children.

In the NC House and Senate, Roy Cooper fought to increase teacher pay and reduce class sizes. He wrote North Carolina’s first children’s health insurance initiative. During his service in the legislature, Roy Cooper worked with members of both parties to get balanced budgets that raised teacher pay to the national average, grow the economy and cut taxes for middle class families.

In 2000, the people of North Carolina elected Roy Cooper as Attorney General, where he continued to fight for families during his four terms. He cracked down on child predators, worked to increase penalties for drug dealers, and oversaw a sharp decrease in crime. He partnered with law enforcement and school administrators to make schools safer, and helped protect victims of domestic violence and stalking. He also made protecting consumers a priority, fighting to keep utility rates low, put predatory lenders out of business, and help families fend off telemarketers.

Roy Cooper entered public service to fight for communities like the one where he grew up. Born and raised in Nash County, he attended public schools and worked summers on the family farm before attending UNC-Chapel Hill on a Morehead Scholarship. His mother, Beverly Cooper, worked as a school teacher, and his father, Roy Cooper Jr., farmed and practiced law.

After earning a law degree from UNC, Roy Cooper returned home to Nash County to practice law and, with his wife Kristin, raise three daughters – Hilary, Natalie, and Claire.  He taught Sunday School, served as an elder and deacon in his church, and tutored students in local schools.

Roy Cooper believes in the potential of our great state and its people. He knows that we can build a state and an economy that work for everyone. By investing in our public schools and giving students the tools they need to succeed, creating good jobs and raising incomes for the middle class, and strengthening our communities, North Carolinians can live and work in places they are proud to call home.

 

Experience

Work Experience

  • Representative /Member
    North Carolina House of Representatives
    1986 to present
  • Representative /Member
    North Carolina Senate
    1990 to present
  • Democratic Majority Leader
    1997 to present
  • North Carolina Attorney General
    2001 to 2017

Education

Personal

Birth Year: 1957

Place of Birth: Nashville, North Caroline, USA

Gender: Male

Race(s): Caucasian

Religion: Christian: Presbyterian

Spouse: Kristin Cooper

 

Membership & Affiliation

Instructor, Continuing Legal Education
Sunday School Teacher/Deacon, First Presbyterian Church
Chair, Local Morehead Scholarship Selection Committee
Chair, March of Dimes Annual Fundraiser
Member, North Carolina Bar Association
Board of Directors, North Carolinians for Community Colleges
Former Board Member, United Way Visions, Incorporated

Contact

Email:

Offices

North Carolina Office of the Governor
20301 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-0301
Phone: (919)814-2000

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Campaign Twitter , Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Roy Asberry Cooper III (born June 13, 1957) is an American attorney and politician, serving since 2017 as the 75th governor of North Carolina. A member of the Democratic Party, he served as the 49th attorney general of North Carolina from 2001 to 2017. He also served in the North Carolina General Assembly in both the House of Representatives (1987–1991) and Senate (1991–2001).[1]

Cooper defeated Republican incumbent Pat McCrory for the governorship in a close race in the 2016 election.[2] On December 5, McCrory conceded the election, making Cooper the first challenger to defeat a sitting governor in the state’s history.[3] Cooper took office on January 1, 2017. The Republican-dominated legislature passed bills in a special session before he took office to reduce the power of the governor’s office. The legislature has overridden several of his vetoes of legislation. Cooper was reelected in 2020, defeating Republican nominee and Lieutenant Governor Dan Forest.

Early life and education

Roy Asberry Cooper III was born on June 13, 1957, in Nashville, North Carolina to Beverly Batchelor and Roy Asberry Cooper II.[4] His mother was a teacher and his father a lawyer. Cooper attended public school and worked on his parents’ tobacco farm during summer.[5] He graduated from Northern Nash High School in 1975.[4] He received the Morehead Scholarship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for his undergraduate studies. As an undergraduate at UNC, he was a member of Chi Psi Fraternity. He was elected president of the university’s Young Democrats.[6] He earned a Juris Doctor degree from the University of North Carolina School of Law in 1982.[4]

State legislature

Cooper during his tenure as a state senator

After practicing law with his family’s law firm for a number of years, Cooper was elected to the North Carolina House of Representatives in 1986. He was appointed to the North Carolina Senate in 1991 to serve the remainder of a term of a senator who had vacated his seat. In 1997, he was elected as Democratic majority leader of the State Senate. He continued to practice law as the managing partner of Fields & Cooper in Rocky Mount and Nashville, North Carolina.

North Carolina Attorney General

Elections

Cooper was elected North Carolina attorney general in November 2000 and took office on January 6, 2001; he was reelected in 2004. Cooper was mentioned as a possible Democratic candidate for governor in 2008, but decided to run for reelection as attorney general instead.[7] He was easily reelected, defeating Republican Bob Crumley and garnering more votes than any other statewide candidate in the 2008 attorney general election.[8]

Both state and national Democrats attempted to recruit him to run against Republican U.S. Senator Richard Burr in 2010, but he declined.[9] In 2012, politicians suggested him as a possible candidate for governor of North Carolina after incumbent Governor Bev Perdue announced her retirement, but Cooper declined to run.[10] His political consultant announced in 2011 that Cooper would seek a fourth term in 2012.[11] He was unopposed in both the Democratic primary and the general election.[12] In the November 2012 elections, Cooper received 2,828,941 votes.

Tenure

Attorney General Roy Cooper in 2009

In January 2007, when Durham District Attorney Mike Nifong asked to be recused from dealing with the Duke lacrosse case, Cooper’s office assumed responsibility for the case. On April 11, 2007, after revelations of Nifong’s withholding of evidence, fabrications, and other ethics violations, Cooper dismissed the case against the Duke lacrosse team players, taking the extraordinary step of declaring them “innocent” and victims of a “tragic rush to accuse”.[13] The decision won him bipartisan praise.[6] Two days after the 2007 Virginia Tech shooting, he created the Campus Safety Task Force to analyze school shootings and make policy recommendations to help the government prevent and respond to them. The committee delivered its report to him in January 2008. After the release of the task force’s findings, Cooper assisted members of the North Carolina General Assembly in passing a law that required court clerks to record involuntary commitments in a national gun permit database.[14]

After a 2010 decision by a three-judge panel to exonerate Gregory Taylor, who had served nearly 17 years for the first-degree murder of Jaquetta Thomas, Cooper ordered an audit after it was learned that officials at the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation forensic lab had withheld information. This suppression of evidence had contributed to Taylor’s conviction for murder. The audit was released in 2010; it found that it had been common practice for two decades for a select group of agents at the State Bureau of Investigation to withhold information. In addition, they did not keep up with scientific standards and the latest tests. The two investigators, Chris Swecker and Micheal Fox, cited almost 230 cases that were tainted by these actions. Three people convicted in such cases had been executed; 80 defendants convicted were still in prison. A massive state effort was undertaken to follow up on their cases.

In 2011 Cooper argued his first case before the United States Supreme Court, J. D. B. v. North Carolina, a case related to Miranda rights in juvenile cases.[15][16] The Court ruled 5–4 against North Carolina.[17][18]

Governor of North Carolina

Elections

2016

Cooper campaigning in October 2016

Cooper ran for governor of North Carolina in the 2016 election against incumbent Republican Pat McCrory.[2] In March 2016, the North Carolina General Assembly passed the Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act—commonly known as “House Bill 2″—which McCrory signed into law.[19][20] Numerous corporations began boycotting the state in protest of the law, cancelling job investment and expansion plans.[20] Cooper denounced the law as unconstitutional and refused to defend it in court in his capacity as attorney general.[21]

As a result of the economic damage the law caused, McCrory’s approval rating fell dramatically in the months before the election.[20] When initial election results showed Cooper leading, McCrory claimed without evidence that the election had been manipulated by voter fraud. Recounts resulted in slightly higher margins of victory for Cooper,[22] and after an extended legal battle, McCrory conceded the election on December 5.[23] Out of 4.7 million total ballots, Cooper won by 10,227 votes.[24]

2020

On December 5, 2019, Cooper announced his candidacy for reelection.[25] He won the November 3 election, defeating Republican nominee Lieutenant Governor Dan Forest by 4.4 points.[26]

Transition

Dismayed by Cooper’s win, the General Assembly passed special legislation before he was inaugurated to reduce the power of the governor’s office.[27] In what The New York Times described as a “surprise special session”, Republican legislators moved to strip Cooper’s powers before he assumed the governorship on January 1, 2017.[28] Throughout December, Cooper oversaw an attempt to repeal the Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act. The repeal attempt failed after a deal between state Republican and Democratic lawmakers and Charlotte officials fell apart.

Tenure

Cooper being sworn-in as governor of North Carolina

After taking office, as of January 6, 2017, Cooper requested federal approval for Medicaid coverage expansion in North Carolina.[29] Effective January 15, however, a federal judge halted Cooper’s request, an order that expired on January 29.[30][31] In his first months in office Cooper focused on repealing the Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act. After long negotiations with Republican state legislators, Cooper agreed in late March to sign a law that prohibited North Carolina cities from passing local ordinances pertaining to public accommodations or employment practices for three years in exchange for the reversal of the facilities act.[32] On May 9, 2017, President Donald Trump appointed Cooper to a commission tasked with reducing opioid addiction.[33]

After the Supreme Court of the United States declared North Carolina’s legislative maps unconstitutional,[34] Cooper called for a special redistricting session on June 7, 2017.[35] But the House and Senate cancelled the session, calling it unconstitutional.[36] On June 29, Cooper signed the STOP Act, an overhaul of the prescribing and dispensing regulations of opioids.[37]

Governor Cooper, Dan Forest and Thom Tillis meet with President Donald Trump, September 2018

On July 1, Cooper signed a bill to allow alcohol sales after 10 AM on Sundays, nicknamed the “Brunch Bill”.[38] On July 11, Cooper signed “Britney’s Law”, which states a homicide is first-degree murder if the killing was committed with malice and the defendant has been convicted of domestic violence or stalking the victim. He also signed two bills to allow domestic violence protective orders granted by a judge to fully go into effect even when they are under appeal and to expand the state’s “revenge porn” law from cases involving former lovers to those involving strangers.[39] On July 12, Cooper signed a bill that would add lessons on what to do when pulled over by law enforcement to the state’s driver’s education curriculum. The bill passed both chambers unanimously.[40]

On July 26, 2017, Cooper signed a bill to mount cameras on school buses in order to reduce drivers who illegally pass stopped school buses.[41] On August 31, 2017, he declared a state of emergency due to plummeting gas supply,[42] which was rescinded on September 18.[43]

Cooper’s fellow Appalachian governors elected him co-chair of the Appalachian Regional Commission for 2019, making him the first North Carolina governor to co-chair the ARC since Jim Hunt in 1978.[44] In the November 2018 elections, the Republican Party lost seats in the General Assembly, ending its supermajorities in both houses and rendering it unable to override gubernatorial vetoes.[45] On March 6, 2019, Cooper proposed a $25.2 billion budget for the year. It included salary increases for public school teachers and state workers, expansion of Medicaid, and a $3.9 billion bond (subject to a referendum) to help fund school construction and local infrastructure projects. Cooper said that he was confident he could get the legislature, without enough Republican members to override a veto, to implement some of his ideas.[46]

On March 10, 2020, Cooper declared a state of emergency in North Carolina due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[47] Four days later, he issued an executive order banning gatherings of over 100 people, and closed all K-12 schools for two weeks.[48]

Vetoes

Cooper’s first veto as governor was of a bill that would make elections to the North Carolina Superior Court and to the District Court partisan, after being conducted on a nonpartisan basis for many years.[49] The House overrode the veto on March 22, 2017.[50] The Senate followed suit on March 23, resulting in the bill becoming law over Cooper’s objection.[51]

Cooper vetoed a bill on April 21, 2017, to reduce the size of the North Carolina Court of Appeals by three judges.[52] The veto was overridden on April 26.[53] He also vetoed a bill on April 21, 2017, that would create a new State Board of Elections (and new county boards of elections) split evenly between the Republicans and the Democrats. It would replace the longstanding system that gave the governor’s party a majority on the board.[52] Both houses of the legislature voted to override the veto on April 24 and 25.[54]

Cooper also vetoed a bill that would limit individuals’ ability to sue hog farms.[55] This veto was also overridden by the legislature.[56][57] On June 27, Cooper vetoed the proposed state budget, which he had called “irresponsible” the day before.[58] In his veto message, Cooper cited the budget’s income tax cuts and argued it “lacks structural integrity by failing to account for population growth, inflation and looming federal reductions, by using one-time revenue for recurring expenses, and by adopting a tax plan that will cause the state to fail to fund promised teacher salary increases in future years” and the proposed bill included “provisions that infringe upon the governor’s ability to faithfully execute the laws, including the administration of this Act, as required by the Constitution, and violating the separation of powers”. The legislature overrode his veto the next day.[59]

In July 2017, Cooper vetoed a bill to authorize nonprofit organizations to operate “game nights”, saying it would unintentionally create a new opportunity for the video poker industry.[60]

In December 2018, the North Carolina General Assembly passed a bill that would require new primary elections if a do-over election was called in the 9th district election.[61] Cooper vetoed the bill due to a provision that made campaign finance investigations less public, but the General Assembly overrode his veto.[62]

In total, during his first two years in office, Cooper vetoed 28 bills, 23 of which were overridden by the legislature.[63]

In May 2019, Cooper vetoed a bill that proposed punishments in the form of prison time and fines against physicians and nurses who do not resuscitate newborns that survive an abortion.[64] He said that the “bill is an unnecessary interference between doctors and their patients”[65] and that laws “already protect newborn babies”.[66]

Personal life

Roy Cooper and his family at a campaign rally, November 2016

Roy Cooper is married to Kristin Cooper (née Bernhardt), who worked as a guardian ad litem for foster children in Wake County.[67][68] They have three daughters, who all graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.[69][70] They reside in the Executive Mansion. Cooper has taught Sunday school classes, serving as a deacon and elder at First Presbyterian Church of Raleigh,[71] and is an avid fan of the NHL‘s Carolina Hurricanes.[72]

Electoral history

2000 North Carolina Attorney General election
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticRoy Cooper1,446,79351.21
RepublicanDan Boyce1,310,84546.40
ReformMargaret Palms67,5362.39
Total votes2,825,174 100.00
2004 North Carolina Attorney General election
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticRoy Cooper (inc.)1,872,09755.61
RepublicanJoe Knott1,494,12144.39
Total votes3,366,218 100.00
2008 North Carolina Attorney General election
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticRoy Cooper (inc.)2,538,17861.10
RepublicanBob Crumley1,615,76238.90
Total votes4,153,940 100.00
2012 North Carolina Attorney General election
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticRoy Cooper (inc.)2,828,941100.00
Total votes2,828,941 100.00
2016 North Carolina Democratic gubernatorial primary
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticRoy Cooper710,65868.70
DemocraticKen Spaulding323,77431.30
Total votes1,034,432 100.00
2016 North Carolina gubernatorial election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticRoy Cooper 2,309,162 49.02 +5.79%
RepublicanPat McCrory2,298,88148.80−5.82%
LibertarianLon Cecil102,9782.19+0.06%
Margin of victory10,2810.22−7.92%
Turnout4,711,02168.98+1.68%
Democratic gain from Republican
2020 North Carolina Democratic gubernatorial primary[73]
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticRoy Cooper (inc.)1,128,82987.19
DemocraticErnest T. Reeves165,80412.81
Total votes1,294,633 100.00
2020 North Carolina gubernatorial election[74]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticRoy Cooper (inc.) 2,834,790 51.52% +2.5%
RepublicanDan Forest2,586,60447.01%-1.8%
LibertarianSteven J. DiFiore60,4491.10%-1.09%
ConstitutionAl Pisano20,9340.38%
Total votes5,502,777 100.0%
Democratic hold

References

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  20. ^ a b c Weichelt 2018, p. 241.
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  34. ^ “Supreme Court Rejects 2 N.C. Congressional Districts As Unconstitutional”. Npr.org. May 23, 2017. Archived from the original on July 23, 2018. Retrieved December 30, 2018.
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  38. ^ Chris Ruffin (June 30, 2017). “Gov. Roy Cooper signs “brunch bill”. Wxii12.com. Archived from the original on December 3, 2018. Retrieved December 30, 2018.
  39. ^ WWAY TV3 (July 11, 2017). “Cooper bills against domestic violence into law”. Wwaytv3.com. Archived from the original on July 23, 2018. Retrieved December 30, 2018.
  40. ^ “Cooper vetoes casino night bill, signs traffic stop legislation”. WRAL.com. July 12, 2017. Archived from the original on February 5, 2021. Retrieved February 1, 2021.
  41. ^ “Cooper signs bill to mount cameras on school buses”. WRAL.com. July 25, 2017. Archived from the original on November 29, 2020. Retrieved February 1, 2021.
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  44. ^ “NC Gov. Cooper: Governor Cooper to Serve As 2019 Appalachian Regional Commission States Co-Chair”. governor.nc.gov. Archived from the original on January 10, 2019. Retrieved January 10, 2019.
  45. ^ Tiberii, Jeff (November 7, 2018). “Republicans Lose Supermajorities In North Carolina General Assembly”. WUNC. Archived from the original on March 8, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  46. ^ “Cooper confident he now has leverage to get more from lawmakers in budget”. WRAL.com. Capitol Broadcasting Company. March 6, 2019. Archived from the original on May 23, 2019. Retrieved March 6, 2019.
  47. ^ “NC Gov. Cooper: Governor Cooper Declares State Of Emergency To Respond To Coronavirus COVID-19”. governor.nc.gov. Archived from the original on March 15, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  48. ^ Featherston, Emily. “Governor Cooper orders closing of all N.C. public schools, bans large gatherings”. WECT. Archived from the original on August 6, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  49. ^ “NC Gov. Cooper: Governor Cooper Signs Veto of House Bill 100”. governor.nc.gov. Archived from the original on March 17, 2017. Retrieved March 16, 2017.
  50. ^ “House votes to override Cooper veto of partisan judicial elections bill”. WRAL.com. March 22, 2017. Archived from the original on February 5, 2021. Retrieved February 1, 2021.
  51. ^ Boughton, Melissa (March 23, 2017). “NC Policy Watch”. Pulse.ncpolicywatch.org. Archived from the original on December 30, 2018. Retrieved December 30, 2018.
  52. ^ a b “NC Gov. Cooper: Governor Cooper Vetoes House Bill 239 and Senate Bill 68”. governor.nc.gov. Archived from the original on April 22, 2017. Retrieved April 21, 2017.
  53. ^ “NC General Assembly: House Bill 239 / S.L. 2017-7”. Ncleg.net. Archived from the original on November 7, 2017. Retrieved December 30, 2018.
  54. ^ “Lawmakers override Cooper again; combine elections, ethics oversight”. WRAL.com. April 25, 2017. Archived from the original on November 29, 2020. Retrieved February 1, 2021.
  55. ^ “Cooper Vetoes Hog Farm Protection Bill”. Newsobserver.com. May 5, 2017. Archived from the original on November 23, 2018. Retrieved December 30, 2018.
  56. ^ Cory Mannion (May 11, 2017). “House overrides Governor Roy Cooper’s veto on nuisance lawsuit caps. Senate comes next”. Portcitydaily.com. Archived from the original on May 22, 2018. Retrieved December 30, 2018.
  57. ^ GARY D. ROBERTSON, Associated Press (May 11, 2017). “Legislature overrides Cooper veto on hog farm odor lawsuits”. Citizen-times.com. Archived from the original on August 19, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2018.
  58. ^ “Cooper vetoes budget – and hints at another lawsuit”. Newsobserver.com. Archived from the original on December 30, 2018. Retrieved December 30, 2018.
  59. ^ Rodriguez, Gloria (June 28, 2017). “Lawmakers override Cooper’s budget veto”. ABC11 Raleigh-Durham. Archived from the original on February 4, 2021. Retrieved February 1, 2021.
  60. ^ “NC Gov. Cooper: Bill Signings for July 12, 2017”. governor.nc.gov. Archived from the original on August 16, 2017. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  61. ^ “After fraud probe, new NC primary may replace GOP candidate | Elections”. Greensboro News and Record. greensboro.com. December 16, 2018. Archived from the original on August 6, 2020. Retrieved December 20, 2018.
  62. ^ “North Carolina lawmakers override veto of elections bill”. TheHill. December 27, 2018. Archived from the original on December 30, 2018. Retrieved December 30, 2018.
  63. ^ “Will second half of Cooper’s term be more productive than first?”. WRAL.com. January 2, 2019. Archived from the original on January 2, 2019. Retrieved January 2, 2019.
  64. ^ “Fact-checking claims about abortion and ‘born alive’ bill”. PolitiFact North Carolina. Archived from the original on May 15, 2019. Retrieved May 15, 2019.
  65. ^ Cooper, Roy (April 18, 2019). “Governor Roy Cooper Objections and Veto Message”. State of North Carolina. Archived from the original on June 6, 2019. Retrieved May 15, 2019. … unnecessary interference between doctors and their patients.
  66. ^ Jason Hanna (April 18, 2019). “North Carolina governor vetoes ‘born alive’ abortion bill”. CNN. Archived from the original on May 15, 2019. Retrieved May 15, 2019.
  67. ^ Kristin Cooper. “My dad Capt. Sam Bernhardt with the 7th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, Cu Chi, Vietnam, ’66-’67. When he was drafted, he closed his medical practice & left his wife & 4 young children to serve his country. Thanks to every veteran for your service & sacrifice. -KC #VeteransDay”. Twitter. Archived from the original on November 15, 2017. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  68. ^ Davis, Corey (August 7, 2018). “Service project aids foster kids”. Rocky Mount Telegram. Archived from the original on August 17, 2018. Retrieved August 17, 2018.
  69. ^ “N.C. First Lady Kristin Cooper will be 2017 commencement speaker”. Saint Mary’s School. Archived from the original on August 17, 2018. Retrieved August 17, 2018.
  70. ^ Colvard, Bill (June 9, 2018). “Franklin grads, NC first lady reconnect”. The Mt. Airy News. Archived from the original on August 17, 2018. Retrieved August 17, 2018.
  71. ^ Bennett, Tom (October 26, 2019). “A Democratic Governor’s Rural Strategy: Highways for Trump Counties”. Daily Yonder. Archived from the original on June 16, 2020. Retrieved June 16, 2020.
  72. ^ Observer, Luke DeCock Raleigh News &. “Gov. Cooper a homegrown Canes fan”. Winston-Salem Journal. Archived from the original on July 29, 2020. Retrieved July 29, 2020.
  73. ^ “NC SBE Election Contest Details”. er.ncsbe.gov. Archived from the original on April 22, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2021.
  74. ^ “NC SBE Election Contest Details”. er.ncsbe.gov. Archived from the original on April 20, 2021. Retrieved August 19, 2021.

Works cited

External links

North Carolina House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the North Carolina House of Representatives
from the 72nd district

1987–1991
Succeeded by

North Carolina Senate
Preceded by

Member of the North Carolina Senate
from the 10th district

1991–2001
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Majority Leader of the North Carolina Senate
1997–2001
Succeeded by

Party political offices
Preceded by

Mike Easley
Democratic nominee for Attorney General of North Carolina
2000, 2004, 2008, 2012
Succeeded by

Josh Stein
Preceded by

Democratic nominee for Governor of North Carolina
2016, 2020
Most recent
Preceded by

Chair of the Democratic Governors Association
2021–present
Incumbent
Legal offices
Preceded by

Attorney General of North Carolina
2001–2017
Succeeded by

Political offices
Preceded by

Governor of North Carolina
2017–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

as Vice President

Order of precedence of the United States
Within North Carolina
Succeeded by

Mayor of city
in which event is held
Succeeded by

Preceded by

as Governor of New York

Order of precedence of the United States
Outside North Carolina
Succeeded by

as Governor of Rhode Island


Recent Elections

2016 Democratic Primary

Roy Cooper (D)710,65868.7%
Ken Spaulding (D)323,77431.3%
TOTAL1,034,432

2016 US Senator

Roy Cooper (D)2,309,19049.2%
Pat McCrory (R)2,298,92748.8%
Lon Cecil (L)102,9862.19%
TOTAL4,711,103

Committees

Appointments

 

 

Issues

Source: Government page

Jobs/Economy
North Carolina succeeds by creating good-paying jobs that put more money in the pockets of hardworking North Carolinians. Under Governor Cooper’s leadership, North Carolina announced more than 40,000 new jobs for both urban and rural parts of our state

North Carolina is home to more than 800,000 small businesses and Governor Cooper is committed to helping them thrive. He has proposed help for small businesses with early-stage technology development and grant funding to help small- and mid-sized communities transition into an innovation-based economy.

To bring opportunity to struggling areas, he has proposed the Rural Investments Strengthening Economies (RISE) Program to revitalize communities and encourage companies to locate or expand in North Carolina’s 80 rural counties. In addition, he is pushing for expanded broadband access, which is key to small business success in rural areas. Governor Cooper knows that we must focus on making North Carolina’s economy work for everyone, not just those at the top. His administration focuses on putting more money in the pockets of working families by strengthening existing companies, recruiting new businesses, and helping small businesses start up and grow.
Education
Governor Cooper is working to strengthen our education system from early childhood through postsecondary education and make the investments necessary to ensure that all North Carolina students have access to a high-quality public education. He has proposed solutions to keep our public schools strong and make North Carolina a Top Ten Educated State by 2025.

A quality teacher in every classroom and a quality principal in every school make for great public schools – and our children deserve nothing less.

In his latest budget, Governor Cooper proposed an average 9.1% teacher pay raise over the next two years, with every teacher receiving at least a 3% raise each year, to get North Carolina on track to best in the Southeast for teacher pay by 2023.

It’s been over 20 years since North Carolina passed a school construction bond, and the Governor’s proposed budget supports a $3.9 billion bond to build and renovate public schools and meet other key infrastructure needs.

In recent years, too many tragedies have taken place at our nation’s schools. Governor Cooper is committed to keeping students and schools safe. He has proposed more funding to update school facilities, hire more nurses, counselors, and mental health professionals in schools, and increase funding for school resource officers, along with common sense gun legislation.

For decades, North Carolina’s world-class community colleges and universities have had a reputation for excellence. Governor Cooper is committed to maintaining that reputation with continued investments and ongoing support.
Healthcare
Governor Cooper is working to help North Carolinians live healthier, more abundant and purposeful lives. His experience helping write and pass the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) showed the importance of getting coverage to keep families healthy. Governor Cooper is leading the charge to close the health care coverage gap by expanding access to Medicaid. This would cover over 500,000 North Carolinians, bring more than $4 billion into our economy, create 40,000 new jobs, and help control private insurance premiums, which are benefits a majority of other states are getting from expanding Medicaid.

Expanding access to health care would also combat the drug use crisis plaguing our communities. Governor Cooper put in place North Carolina’s first opioid action plan, served on the President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis, and signed the STOP Act to stop over prescription of highly addictive drugs.
Workforce Development
Workforce development is a primary focus for Governor Cooper as he seeks to ensure more North Carolinians are ready for the jobs of today and tomorrow.

Governor Cooper’s NC Job Ready initiative is helping people get good-paying jobs to support themselves and their families by investing in workforce development and job training. NC Job Ready helps connect workers with job training and employers with the skilled workers they need to grow and succeed.

To help people complete the training they need to get good jobs, Governor Cooper created the Finish Line Grants program. The program helps community college students who face unforeseen financial emergencies like medical bills, car repairs and childcare costs stay in school. Already, more than 500 Finish Line Grants have helped students stay on track to getting a good-paying job. Governor Cooper wants to expand the program to students at all colleges in North Carolina.

Gov. Cooper and other North Carolina leaders are committed to the My Future NC goal of ensuring that 2 million working-age North Carolinians have a degree or credential beyond high school by 2030. To get there, he proposed NC GROW (Getting Ready for Opportunities in the Workforce) a scholarship and aid program to help people get community college degrees and job training.  NC GROW would cover last-dollar tuition and fees for North Carolina community college students enrolled in high-demand fields like construction, information technology, and electrical line work. The program would also provide up to $1,000 per community college student to pursue non-credit, short-term workforce credentials for jobs in these fields.

Learn more about Governor Cooper’s efforts to build a strong workforce.
Environment
Protecting our state’s natural resources is critical for our families and our economy. North Carolina is a proud leader in renewable energy. We are second in the nation in solar energy, creating thousands of jobs and reducing harmful emissions. Governor Cooper supports continued investments in renewable energy that advance our economy and help our environment.

Governor Cooper is also leading the fight to protect North Carolina’s coast from offshore drilling. Offshore drilling threatens North Carolina’s $3 billion coastal tourism industry and could cost the commercial and recreational fishing communities hundreds of millions of dollars. Governor Cooper is working across party lines with other state and local leaders to stand up to the federal government and say, “not off our coast.”

To ensure North Carolina’s commitment to fight climate change and lead North Carolina’s transition to a clean energy economy, Governor Roy Cooper issued Executive Order No. 80. The executive order calls for the State of North Carolina to protect North Carolina’s environment while growing clean energy technologies.

Every family in North Carolina deserves access to clean drinking water and air. Governor Cooper is pushing to ensure that North Carolina has the resources we need to keep our environment safe and hold polluters accountable.  His budget invests in more resources to analyze pollutants, encourage clean energy, and protect waterways and green space. Learn more about how Governor Cooper wants to invest in protecting our environment.
Disaster Recovery
Help can never arrive soon enough to those affected by disasters. And, unfortunately, North Carolina is no stranger to natural disasters. Whether the harm comes from tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, wildfires or other disasters, Governor Cooper is committed to ensuring that North Carolinians get the help they need after disaster strikes.

In recent years, North Carolina has been hit especially hard, with Hurricanes Florence, Matthew and Michael causing billions of dollars in damage. But North Carolina is stronger than any storm, and Governor Cooper’s administration is working with federal, state and local partners to rebuild.

North Carolinians have gotten more than $1 billion in help recovering with more on the way to continue making families and communities whole.  North Carolina has seen progress as families have returned home, roads and bridges have been repaired and businesses have reopened, but more work remains to rebuild resilient communities.

To ensure North Carolina is prepared for future hurricanes, the Administration has focused on flood mapping key areas and moving and elevating homes that are at risk in future storms. Governor Cooper has created a new agency, the North Carolina Office of Recovery and Resilience, to help our state rebuild stronger and smarter. He’s requested billions of dollars in additional help recovering from Hurricane Florence, and he also wants to invest to prepare for future disasters.
Military/ Veterans
North Carolina is the most military friendly state in the nation. Governor Cooper is proud that North Carolina has the third largest military presence in the country, as well as more than 720,000 veterans who call our state home.

Governor Cooper knows we owe these veterans, servicemembers and their families a debt of gratitude for sacrificing to protect our safety.

To help make North Carolina a welcoming place for servicemembers who are transitioning into civilian life, Governor Cooper established the Governor’s Working Group on Veterans Affairs, which focuses on job creation, workforce enrichment, health and wellness, legal and financial services and benefits for veterans.

North Carolina is making progress on reducing homelessness among veterans and, according to the latest information, veteran homelessness in North Carolina decreased by more than 5percent from 2017 to 2018.
Infrastructure
As our state and economy continue to grow, North Carolina’s families and businesses need roads, bridges, and technology infrastructure to keep thriving. Governor Cooper is working with state and local leaders to address our state’s infrastructure needs.

Governor Cooper and his Department of Transportation successfully passed the Build NC Bond Act with support from Democrats and Republicans. This law will help expedite critical highway projects, improving the everyday lives of people all over the state and encouraging businesses to grow and locate in North Carolina.

Governor Cooper also knows that access to broadband is a must for economic success in our rural communities and across the state. He proposed funding to improve internet access and service to households and businesses in underserved areas of North Carolina, including a grant program to help local governments partnering with private providers and utility cooperatives complete ‘last mile’ broadband projects.
Public Safety
Public safety is a core priority for state government, and Governor Cooper is committed to keeping families and communities safe.

Governor Cooper recognizes that state prisons can and should be made safer for those who work in them. Correctional officers do a difficult and demanding job, and Governor Cooper’s prison safety solutions include additional training, enhanced surveillance and updated technology and facilities. He has supported investments to increase compensation and retirement benefits for correctional officers that can help recruit and retain talent

Throughout his career, Governor Cooper has championed commonsense efforts to help formerly incarcerated people become productive members of their communities. Governor Cooper tasked the Department of Public Safety with developing a Reentry Action Plan to comprehensively address re-entry issues and improve the transition for people returning from jail or prison.

Governor Cooper’s administration has focused on cross-cutting strategies to improve school safety across North Carolina. Experts from law enforcement, schools, juvenile justice, emergency fire and medical services and emergency managers have convened to ensure schools have the resources and support they need to prevent a tragedy or respond in a worst-case scenario.
Early Childhood
The foundation for future learning, health, and well-being is built during early childhood. Governor Cooper wants all North Carolina children to get off to a strong start in safe and nurturing families and communities, with access to high-quality opportunities to learn and thrive. we give children a fair chance for a strong foundation in their first years of life,

The NC Early Childhood Action Plan released on February 27, 2019 and created at Governor Cooper’s direction lays out a bold vision and roadmap for how the state can create better futures for our young children by 2025. Governor Cooper’s budget makes critical investments toward achieving these goals to ensure North Carolina’s children are healthy, safe and nurtured, and ready to succeed, including increased investment in Smart Start and NC Pre-K.

Learn more about how Governor Cooper wants to invest in early childhood.

Economy

Jobs and Economy

Building an Economy that Works for Everyone

North Carolina succeeds by creating good-paying jobs that put more money in the pockets of hardworking North Carolinians. Under Governor Cooper’s leadership, North Carolina announced more than 60,000 new jobs for both urban and rural parts of our state

North Carolina is home to more than 800,000 small businesses and Governor Cooper is committed to helping them thrive. He has proposed help for small businesses with early-stage technology development and grant funding to help small- and mid-sized communities transition into an innovation-based economy.

To bring opportunity to struggling areas, he has proposed the Rural Investments Strengthening Economies (RISE) Program to revitalize communities and encourage companies to locate or expand in North Carolina’s 80 rural counties. In addition, he is pushing for expanded broadband access, which is key to small business success in rural areas. Governor Cooper knows that we must focus on making North Carolina’s economy work for everyone, not just those at the top. His administration focuses on putting more money in the pockets of working families by strengthening existing companies, recruiting new businesses, and helping small businesses start up and grow.

Workforce Development

Making North Carolina Job Ready

Workforce development is a primary focus for Governor Cooper as he seeks to ensure more North Carolinians are ready for the jobs of today and tomorrow.

Governor Cooper’s NC Job Ready initiative is helping people get good-paying jobs to support themselves and their families by investing in workforce development and job training. NC Job Ready helps connect workers with job training and employers with the skilled workers they need to grow and succeed.

To help people complete the training they need to get good jobs, Governor Cooper created the Finish Line Grants program. The program helps community college students who face unforeseen financial emergencies like medical bills, car repairs and childcare costs stay in school. Already, more than 3,000 Finish Line Grants have helped students stay on track to getting a good-paying job. Governor Cooper wants to expand the program to students at all colleges in North Carolina.

Gov. Cooper and other North Carolina leaders are committed to the My Future NC goal of ensuring that 2 million working-age North Carolinians have a degree or credential beyond high school by 2030. To get there, he proposed NC GROW (Getting Ready for Opportunities in the Workforce) a scholarship and aid program to help people get community college degrees and job training.  NC GROW would cover last-dollar tuition and fees for North Carolina community college students enrolled in high-demand fields like construction, information technology, and electrical line work. The program would also provide up to $1,000 per community college student to pursue non-credit, short-term workforce credentials for jobs in these fields.

Education

Early Childhood

Building a Strong Foundation for North Carolina’s Children

The foundation for future learning, health, and well-being is built during early childhood. Governor Cooper wants all North Carolina children to get off to a strong start in safe and nurturing families and communities, with access to high-quality opportunities to learn and thrive. When we give children a fair chance for a strong foundation in their first years of life, we give them a better future and create healthier and more vibrant communities for all of us.

The NC Early Childhood Action Plan released on February 27, 2019 and created at Governor Cooper’s direction lays out a bold vision and roadmap for how the state can create better futures for our young children by 2025. Governor Cooper’s budget makes critical investments toward achieving these goals to ensure North Carolina’s children are healthy, safe and nurtured, and ready to succeed, including increased investment in Smart Start and NC Pre-K.

Education

Investing in Our Future

Governor Cooper is working to strengthen our education system from early childhood through postsecondary education and make the investments necessary to ensure that all North Carolina students have access to a high-quality public education. He has proposed solutions to keep our public schools strong and make North Carolina a Top Ten Educated State by 2025.

A quality teacher in every classroom and a quality principal in every school make for great public schools – and our children deserve nothing less.

In his latest budget, Governor Cooper proposed an average 9.1% teacher pay raise over the next two years, with every teacher receiving at least a 3% raise each year, to get North Carolina on track to best in the Southeast for teacher pay by 2023.

It’s been over 20 years since North Carolina passed a school construction bond, and the Governor’s proposed budget supports a $3.9 billion bond to build and renovate public schools and meet other key infrastructure needs.

In recent years, too many tragedies have taken place at our nation’s schools. Governor Cooper is committed to keeping students and schools safe. He has proposed more funding to update school facilities, hire more nurses, counselors, and mental health professionals in schools, and increase funding for school resource officers, along with common sense gun legislation.

For decades, North Carolina’s world-class community colleges and universities have had a reputation for excellence. Governor Cooper is committed to maintaining that reputation with continued investments and ongoing support.

Environment

Environment

Protecting our Environment

Protecting our state’s natural resources is critical for our families and our economy. North Carolina is a proud leader in renewable energy. We are second in the nation in solar energy, creating thousands of jobs and reducing harmful emissions. Governor Cooper supports continued investments in renewable energy that advance our economy and help our environment.

Governor Cooper is also leading the fight to protect North Carolina’s coast from offshore drilling. Offshore drilling threatens North Carolina’s $3 billion coastal tourism industry and could cost the commercial and recreational fishing communities hundreds of millions of dollars. Governor Cooper is working across party lines with other state and local leaders to stand up to the federal government and say, “not off our coast.”

To ensure North Carolina’s commitment to fight climate change and lead North Carolina’s transition to a clean energy economy, Governor Roy Cooper issued Executive Order No. 80. The executive order calls for the State of North Carolina to protect North Carolina’s environment while growing clean energy technologies.

Every family in North Carolina deserves access to clean drinking water and air. Governor Cooper is pushing to ensure that North Carolina has the resources we need to keep our environment safe and hold polluters accountable.  His budget invests in more resources to analyze pollutants, encourage clean energy, and protect waterways and green space.

Health Care

Healthcare

A Healthier North Carolina

Governor Cooper is working to help North Carolinians live healthier, more abundant and purposeful lives. His experience helping write and pass the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) showed the importance of getting coverage to keep families healthy. Governor Cooper is leading the charge to close the health care coverage gap by expanding access to Medicaid. This would cover over 500,000 North Carolinians, bring more than $4 billion into our economy, create 40,000 new jobs, and help control private insurance premiums, which are benefits a majority of other states are getting from expanding Medicaid.

Expanding access to health care would also combat the drug use crisis plaguing our communities. Governor Cooper put in place North Carolina’s first opioid action plan, served on the President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis, and signed the STOP Act to stop over prescription of highly addictive drugs.

Infrastructure

Infrastructure

Building Infrastructure for the 21st Century

As our state and economy continue to grow, North Carolina’s families and businesses need roads, bridges, and technology infrastructure to keep thriving. Governor Cooper is working with state and local leaders to address our state’s infrastructure needs.

Governor Cooper and his Department of Transportation successfully passed the Build NC Bond Act with support from Democrats and Republicans. This law will help expedite critical highway projects, improving the everyday lives of people all over the state and encouraging businesses to grow and locate in North Carolina.

Governor Cooper also knows that access to broadband is a must for economic success in our rural communities and across the state. He proposed funding to improve internet access and service to households and businesses in underserved areas of North Carolina, including a grant program to help local governments partnering with private providers and utility cooperatives complete ‘last mile’ broadband projects.

Safety

Disaster Recovery

Recovering When Natural Disasters Strike

Help can never arrive soon enough to those affected by disasters. And, unfortunately, North Carolina is no stranger to natural disasters. Whether the harm comes from tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, wildfires or other disasters, Governor Cooper is committed to ensuring that North Carolinians get the help they need after disaster strikes.

In recent years, North Carolina has been hit especially hard, with Hurricanes Florence, Matthew and Michael causing billions of dollars in damage. But North Carolina is stronger than any storm, and Governor Cooper’s administration is working with federal, state and local partners to rebuild.

North Carolinians have gotten more than $1 billion in help recovering with more on the way to continue making families and communities whole.  North Carolina has seen progress as families have returned home, roads and bridges have been repaired and businesses have reopened, but more work remains to rebuild resilient communities.

To ensure North Carolina is prepared for future hurricanes, the Administration has focused on flood mapping key areas and moving and elevating homes that are at risk in future storms. Governor Cooper has created a new agency, the North Carolina Office of Recovery and Resilience, to help our state rebuild stronger and smarter. He’s requested billions of dollars in additional help recovering from Hurricane Florence, and he also wants to invest to prepare for future disasters.

Public Safety

Public safety is a core priority for state government, and Governor Cooper is committed to keeping families and communities safe.

Governor Cooper recognizes that state prisons can and should be made safer for those who work in them. Correctional officers do a difficult and demanding job, and Governor Cooper’s prison safety solutions include additional training, enhanced surveillance and updated technology and facilities. He has supported investments to increase compensation and retirement benefits for correctional officers that can help recruit and retain talent

Throughout his career, Governor Cooper has championed commonsense efforts to help formerly incarcerated people become productive members of their communities. Governor Cooper tasked the Department of Public Safety with developing a Reentry Action Plan to comprehensively address re-entry issues and improve the transition for people returning from jail or prison.

Governor Cooper’s administration has focused on cross-cutting strategies to improve school safety across North Carolina. Experts from law enforcement, schools, juvenile justice, emergency fire and medical services and emergency managers have convened to ensure schools have the resources and support they need to prevent a tragedy or respond in a worst-case scenario.

Governor Cooper has created the Task Force for Racial Equity in Criminal Justice (TREC), which is tasked with examining law enforcement and criminal justice in North Carolina. Guided by your feedback, the Task Force will develop and help implement solutions to eliminate disparate outcomes in the criminal justice system for communities of color.

X

Roy Cooper

Current Position: Governor since 2017
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Attorney General from 2001 – 2017; State Senator from 1991 – 2001; US Representative from 1987 – 1991

Featured Quote: 
Business is thriving in North Carolina, and it’s not hard to see why — our talented workers, welcoming communities and nationally-ranked universities and community colleges continue bringing more companies to our great state.

Featured Video: 
Coronavirus Briefing: NC Gov. Roy Cooper (07/21/21)

Dan Forest

Current Position: Lt. Governor
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2020 Governor

In office, Dan has continually advocated for policies that drive economic growth, create jobs and spur innovation. He has become a leader in the school choice movement as a way to help children succeed regardless of their ZIP code.

Dan also spearheaded an initiative to connect every classroom in North Carolina with high-speed internet, and championed a bill to preserve free speech rights on public college campuses — the first bill of its kind in the United States.

Source: Campaign page

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